Category Archives: Animals

Hark, when the night is falling, Hear, hear, the pipes are calling……..

We all have preconceptions of a place and its people before we go there, based on things we learned at school, television programmes, books we’ve read, sports we follow or even films we’ve watched.
Take Scotland. I’ve never been there but I know all about it ! How?
Well……………………………
at every New Year’s Eve party – even south of the border- I’ve linked hands with people and belted out a rousing chorus of ‘Auld Lang Syne , penned originally by Scottish poet Rabbie Burns, who died quite young but not before writing some of our best loved poems.
I’ve watched the film ‘Braveheart’ (three times!) It stars Mel Gibson. Who can forget his blue warpaint as he galloped across the Scottish countryside as William Wallace, the fearless leader of the Wars of Scottish Independence.

The real Wallace met a grisly end of course, hanged, drawn and quartered as he was, but let’s not dwell on that.
 
I’ve seen documentaries about the breathtaking Scottish landscape. Scotland is divided diagonally NE to SW into the Highlands and Lowlands. The Highlands lay claim to Britain’s highest mountain, Ben Nevis – standing at 1,344 metres above sea level –  in global terms not much more than a hill – after all,  Mount Everest is 8,848 metres high , Mount Toubkal in the Atlas range measures 4,165, and even Spain easily beats it with Torre de Cerredo in the Picos de Europa at 2,650 metres  and Aneto in the Pyrennes at 3, 404 metres.

But what mountains anywhere all have in common is the exciting (not to say hare-brained!) range of winter sports that have grown up around them and Scotland has its fair share of those, and also the more sedate sport of curling – and they’re not half bad at it -remember the 2014 Winter Olympics ?  Eve Muirhead captained the Great Britain team to a bronze medal.
Highland Games – one of my earliest memories of anything Scottish is watching a TV programme (I was about 8 at the time). I was flabbergasted to see a huge bear of a man dressed in a skirt and vest, every muscle straining and every vein bulging as he hoisted the end of a tree trunk skyward and it fell with a crash – he was obviously delighted at the outcome but what was he doing?    I later learned that he was ‘tossing the caber’ – this was one of the Herculean tasks participants of the Highland Games were required to perform; at least this particular task was not just to show off the contestants’ strength – in lumber jacking they sometimes needed to toss logs across narrow chasms to cross them.
I’ve read that ……there’s lots of incredible wildlife up there – 70 % of Scotland’s population live in the Lowlands, leaving the Highlands to creatures like grouse (the capercaillie being the largest of them) red deer, which no longer have any natural predators and so numbers now require ‘managing’ by us humans (oh, no!) and all manner of sea birds such as gannet, puffin and the majestic white tailed eagle  – Mull is a good place to see those, I’m told.
 

And if you venture out onto the water you might see dolphins, seals, even basking sharks – and if you’re really lucky – there’s Nessie – the Loch Ness Monster.

I’ve worn a tartan kilt  and  – who hasn’t heard a rousing band of Scottish pipers at a military tattoo?   Immaculate down to the last detail, marching resolutely  in perfect time or marking time outside the gates to some castle or other, tartan kilts swaying, and sooner or later you know they’ll play the evocative  ‘Scotland the Brave’ whose stirring lyrics and haunting pipes would reduce anyone to tears, Scottish or not.

 
Scottish gastronomy – well, for me it’s porridge, haggis and whisky! I love porridge, can pass on the haggis, though I’m not averse to a bit of offal, but I don’t like whisky  – or know anything about it, even though it is legendary north of the border. I understand there are literally hundreds of distilleries in Scotland, although I’m not sure how many are still Scottish owned (like every other industry on these islands some distillery owners have been forced to close or sell out to foreign companies  –  I believe Bacardi has taken over some distilleries – is nothing sacred!!) I’m sure there’s more to Scottish cuisine than this (Italian fish ‘n’ chips, for example, if you see what I mean!) but nothing comes to mind.
But famous Scots, well, that’s a different story. I’ve already mentioned two – Rabbie Burns and William Wallace, but what about other popular heroes? There’s Stephen Hendry, snooker ace, Billy Connolly AKA The Big Yin, who played John Brown in the film Mrs. Brown opposite Judi Dench’s Queen Victoria.  The story goes that John Brown, who started off as a humble gillie and servant on the Balmoral estate, became a  source of great comfort to the Queen whilst she was grieving for her dear departed, Prince Albert. And a source of great DIScomfort to those around her as they deemed his friendship inappropriate. Connolly proved his worth as an actor in that film. Another literary figure was Sir Walter Scott, the historical novelist, who was a contemporary of Rabbie Burns, a few years younger. His works include ‘Ivanhoe’ – ring a bell? Set in the Middle Ages – knights, crusades and all that,  you know.
And what of the Scottish character. Anecdotally,  the Scots are said to be ‘careful with their money’. It’s also said that the Scottish accent is one of the most popular and that people more readily trust a Scot in business negotiations.  I don’t know enough Scots well enough to comment. My Spanish husband worked with lots and their accent proved impenetrable to him. On the occasions he could get someone else to interpret he said they had a great sense of humour.
My favourite Scot?  Well, at the moment I think it’s Paolo Nutini –

 

obviously, descended from Italian immigrants and didn’t fancy going into the family business. I’m assuming that’s his real name, of course, it could be Alistair Stewart, but that wouldn’t matter – I’d still like his songs.

For me it would be a shame if Scotland became independent, not for any clearly defined political reason – simply because I ascribe to the ‘United we stand, divided we fall’ philosophy – if the U.K. fragments into 4 small states it would be like a family of 4 separating  and not seeing each other again – all four members would be weaker and poorer in every way.
I’m looking forward to my trip to Scotland – I feel my education is sadly lacking !! Time to make amends.
 

Butterflies at Symonds Yat

What to do on a chilly, blustery Wednesday in April whilst waiting for  the British summer to arrive?
I know! A trip to the butterfly centre at Symonds Yat! Inside the butterfly house the atmosphere and temperature are carefully controlled and these beautiful creatures flit from plant to plant and chase each other around their tropical paradise.
The plants are not quite Kew Gardens dimensions but they set the scene
fronds
purple   leaves
spike1
     tangle1    tiger1
red2 trumpet4
trunk3
yellow    whiteStar
and whilst studying the plants you start to notice the brilliantly camouflaged butterflies settled motionless on them – difficult to tell the scale from these photos but these butterflies ranged in width, with wings outspread, from 2-3 inches to 5-6 inches.
blue&black eye1
white&black
Here are a few of the images from my trip.
From velvety black to iridescent blue – I don’t know the names of these lovely butterflies but I’m sure the lepidopterists amongst you will.
black1 blue&black
blueCloseUp2      eye
orange&black2     silhouette
whiteSpotted   whiteSpotted5
whiteSpotted3    whiteSpotted7
 

Photographic A, B, C of 2014

 
I thought I’d round off the year with an a, b, c of photos from my archive:
A is for AC Cobra – a mean, sleek racing machine.
ACCobra
B is for Bull – a Hereford White Face, emblematic breed from my native Herefordshire.
PrizeBull2
C is for Cockerel – this is a composite image from shapes I was playing around with in Photoshop.
cockB&W
D is for Dragon – we found this one in a park just on the outskirts of Barcelona.
dragon
E is for Entrance – the entrance to the Boquería food market in Barcelona city centre – a mecca for all foodies.
entrance
F is for Fire engine – this one is Norwegian – they seem to use them more for clearing the streets than tackling fires.
fireEngine
G is for Graffiti – Barcelona has some fine examples of it.
graffiti
H is for Husky – this one lives in Tromso, Norway with his 299 kennel mates – a vociferous mob but very friendly.
husky
I is for Ikea – that well known purveyor of flat pack furniture.
IkeaToy
J is for Jalopy – this one being put through its paces in the  construction stages by my dad.
Jalopy
K is for Kune kune pig – this breed has gained in popularity over recent years.
Kunekune
L is for Lifeboat – slung overhead they make for an interesting photo.
lifeboat
M is for May Fair – our annual fair invades the town for three days in early May to provide fun and entertainment.
MayFair
N is for Nativity – a traditional alternative in Spain to the Christmas tree – a lot of homes display a nativity scene.
nativity
O is for Origami – my son has become adept at this after a trip to Japan – as you can see, this one is a bookmark shaped like a cat’s head.
origami
P is for Patch – a piebald horse I used to ride who is now contentedly retired.
patch
Q is for Quoits – a very competitive game on board ship !
quoits
R is for Roulette – a rather more sedentary, but nonetheless exciting, game, played in the on board casino.
roulette
S is for Sculpture and this is a beautiful, interactive one.
sculpture
T is for Tree – this one is at Shobdon Arches, Herefordshire.
tree
U is for Ural owl – this feisty youngster lived at Kington Owl Centre, Herefordshire.
 
ural
V is for Vegetable – the talented chef on our cruise ship created all sorts of beautiful vegetable animals and birds inspired by cartoon characters.
vegetables
W is for Windsurfers – there are always some off Barceloneta beach in Barcelona
windsurfers
X is for Xmas starter – I was ready to throw in the towel trying to create this from a Gary Rhodes recipe – only 4 pages of instructions!!XmasStarter
Y is for Youth clinic – children learning to ride at an annual clinic in Monnington, Herefordshire.
youthClinic
Z is for Ziggy – this beautiful animal, owned by friends of mine, was called Ziggy Stardust – sadly no longer around, but aptly named  -a prima donna!
Ziggy